Australians with anxiety reveal the worst advice they have been given
Daily Mail 2hrs ago
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Men and women have revealed the worst advice they have been given for their anxiety - including to 'go on a juice cleanse', 'breathe' and not to stress outside of you allocated 'worry time.

They said they had been given bad advice from most people in their lives, including their parents, partners, doctors and psychologists.

One woman complained that people often tell her to let them know if she needs something, but then walk away before she can answer.

a glass cup on a table: One woman said she was told to 'go on a juice cleanse' to help her mental health © Provided by Daily Mail One woman said she was told to 'go on a juice cleanse' to help her mental health

'"Just don't let it worry you". "Why don't you just relax". "Why are you worried? Everything's ok, isn't it?'",' she said, giving examples of the awkward thing people say to her when she is having an anxiety attack.

Another woman complained about her well-meaning brother's attitude to her mental health: 'He likes to helpfully suggest that he just doesn't worry about it,' she said.

Others complained about people pushing mindfulness, meditation and exercise to 'get their mind off problems'.

Jolie Vanier posing for the camera: Another woman said she is always told to practice mindfulness - which makes her anxiety worse © Provided by Daily Mail Another woman said she is always told to practice mindfulness - which makes her anxiety worse

'A tasting set of responses for depression/anxiety: you have so much to be happy for; think of all the people that have it worse; is it something that I did; just be happy; what is the worst that could happen; it is all in your head; you couldn't possibly be, you are so positive,' one man said.


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Another person claims their GP told them to watch a funny movie or to 'go see the sunset'.

While an overweight woman said her doctor told her losing weight would help with her anxiety. 

'That is always the answer when you're fat. But also not super helpful when your anxiety strongly correlates with an eating disorder,' another said.

Another woman who suffers from anxiety in public situations mentioned a very awkward encounter with her personal trainer.

'She (loudly) called out my anxiety (which is exacerbated by social / public situations/ attention). Then told me she would 'cure' it. She preceded to count backwards from three then clicked her fingers in my face and said 'don't be anxious!' 

Another woman said her friend tells her not to worry so much because the things she worries about are not the things that will get her.

While others said they were told all they needed to do to get on top of their anxiety was to lose weight © Provided by Daily Mail While others said they were told all they needed to do to get on top of their anxiety was to lose weight

'That's because I work hard to protect myself from those things. Also me: worries about what I'm not working about.'

One man said doctors didn't believe he had panic attacks because he was manly.

'The doctor looked at me at disbelief because I was a tall, fairly big, bearded man. Like that made any difference at all. He said, 'A big guy like you, really? Panic attacks? Could be something else'. 

One man admitted to saying some of these things to his partner, out of love and not knowing the right things to say. 

He was told the best things to say are: 'I'm here, this will pass and you are safe.'  

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